USEFUL LINKS

AREAS OF INTEREST

/ MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART DETROIT (MOCAD)

Located on Woodward and Garfield between the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the Detroit Institute of the Arts, Wayne State University and the College for Creative Studies, the museum is an innovative addition to Detroit's vibrant Midtown neighborhood, and functions as a hub for the exploration of emerging ideas in the contemporary arts.
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/ The Heidelberg Project

It's an open-air art environment in the heart of an urban community on Detroit's East Side. Tyree Guyton, founder and artistic director, uses everyday, discarded objects to create a two-block area full of color, symbolism, and intrigue. Now in its 25th year, the Heidelberg Project is recognized around the world as a demonstration of the power of creativity to transform lives.
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/ Pewabic Pottery

Pewabic is a multifaceted institution with active and growing education, exhibition, museum and design and fabrication programs. Pewabic fabricates heirloom quality architectural tiles for public and private installations, gift and commemorative tiles, vessels, garden ware, ornaments and both reproductions and adaptations of its historic designs. Founded in 1903 by Mary Chase Perry (later Mary Chase Perry Stratton) and her partner, Horace Caulkins, at the height of the Arts & Crafts movement in America. Pewabic's first home was a stable on Alfred Street in Detroit. Four years later, Pewabic Pottery moved to a new facility on East Jefferson designed by architect William Buck Stratton in the Tudor Revival style. In 1991, the building (which still houses the Pottery) and its contents were designated a National Historic Landmark and today is Michigan's only historic pottery.
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/ THE HENRY FORD

It began as a simple yet bold idea to document the genius of ordinary people by recognizing and preserving the objects they used in the course of their everyday lives. It grew into the ultimate place to explore what Americans past and present have imagined and invented — a remarkable destination that brings American ideas and innovations to life. The sheer scope and design of Henry Ford Museum is as grand as the vision that inspired it. It's impossible not to feel a sense of awe as your mind adjusts to a different sense of scale — vaster, more expansive and more diverse— by far— than anything you'll encounter in everyday life. The sweeping, single-floor space with its soaring 40-foot ceilings covers nine acres dedicated to showcasing the finest collection of its kind ever assembled.
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/ THE DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS

The DIA's collection is among the top six in the United States, comprising a multicultural and multinational survey of human creativity from prehistory through the 21st century. The DIA has been a beacon of culture for the Detroit area for well over a century. Founded in 1885, the museum was originally located on Jefferson Avenue, but, due to its rapidly expanding collection, moved to a larger site on Woodward Avenue in 1927. The new Beaux-Arts building, designed by Paul Cret, was immediately referred to as the "temple of art." Two wings were added in the 1960s and 1970s, and a major renovation and expansion that began in 1999 was completed in 2007. The museum covers 658,000 square feet that includes more than 100 galleries, a 1,150-seat auditorium, a 380-seat lecture/recital hall, an art reference library, and a state-of-the-art conservation services laboratory.
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/ Detroit Historical Museum

The Detroit Historical Museum, established in 1928, is one of America's oldest and largest museums dedicated to metropolitan history. Over 80,000 square feet of exhibition space house more than 600 historic artifacts in the heart of Detroit's Cultural Center district. You, your family and your friends will stroll through more than 300 years of metro Detroit history, including a 19th century street scene known as The Streets of Old Detroit, and an authentic auto assembly line known simply as The Motor City.
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/ Signal-Return Letterpress in the Eastern Market

A storefront letterpress print shop specializing in teaching workshops and connecting the print media community of Detroit.
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/ DETROIT ARTISTS MARKET

The Detroit Artists Market (DAM) was founded in the midst of the Great Depression and to this day remains dedicated to promoting, exhibiting, and selling the work of emerging and established artists from Detroit and Michigan. Each year DAM produces a varied schedule of juried, curated and market-style exhibitions that offer both artists and visitors a lively culture of experimentation, artistic creativity, and celebration. DAM also offers an impressive lineup of events, including annual favorites like the Garden Party & Art Sale, a summertime festival for members that presents a wide variety of artworks for sale; the DAM Holiday Show, featuring the area’s most unique assortment of seasonal gifts; and, the Elements Gallery, a year-round shop that sells ceramics, sculpture, paintings, jewelry, Detroit memorabilia, and much more. DAM offers nine levels of membership, and artist members are featured in a searchable online database that highlights up to ten works of art from each artist. DAM’s “Art Placement” program is a service offered to local businesses and organizations interested in featuring Detroit-based art in the workplace.
Located at 4719 Woodward Avenue in the heart of Midtown, the Detroit Artists Market is free and open to the public, Tuesday through Saturday, 11a to 6p.
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/ Hitsville USA

2648 West Grand Blvd., 1959: After working as a trimmer at a Ford Motor Company assembly plant, Barry Gordy purchased the house and launches the forerunner to Motown Record Corp. He would apply the quality control management concepts he learned on the assembly line. The house continues today as the Motown Historical Museum.
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/ Piquette Model T

Detroit's Ford Piquette Avenue Plant is the birthplace of the Model T. Today, it is the only example of an early Detroit auto factory open to visitors. You can see where Henry Ford designed the Model T and built the first 12,000 "Tin Lizzies." Learn about the other models Ford built at the Piquette plant between 1904 and 1910. And the colorful personalities of Piquette who set the world's record for car production, making Ford Motor Company the world's largest manufacturer of automobiles in less than four years.
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/ The Dossin Great Lakes Museum

The Dossin Great Lakes Museum, a flagship of the Midwest's inland lakes maritime heritage museums, stands on the shore of Detroit's historic Belle Isle, one of America's grandest city parks. You, your family and your friends will take in a panoramic view of the Detroit River and experience many rare artifacts, including the reconstructed pilot house of the Great Lakes freighter S.S. William Clay Ford, the Miss Pepsi championship hydroplane, and one of the largest known collection of scale model ships in the world.
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/ Anna Scripts Whitcomb Conservatory

Anna Scripts Whitcomb Conservatory is located on Detroit's Belle Isle in the Detroit River, nestled between the city's near East side and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Located just two miles from Detroit's downtown, it will soon be connected to that area via the city's burgeoning International River Walk. The Conservatory, in operation since 1904, features five distinct horticultural houses showcasing plants indigenous around the globe as well as an outside Lily Pond Garden and formal perennial gardens. It is a popular spot for weddings and a Mecca for both professional and amateur photographers.
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/ CRANBROOK ACADEMY OF ART

For more than 75 years, Cranbrook has been home to some of the world's most renowned designers and artists. Eero Saarinen, Charles Eames, Daniel Libeskind, Michael and Katherine McCoy, and Jun Kaneko have all taught here, to name only a few. Our students have included Florence Knoll, Harry Bertoia, Jack Lenor Larsen, Nick Cave, Tony Matelli, Niels Diffrient, Lorraine Wild, and Hani Rashid. It's reasonable to say that the work emanating from Cranbrook in the 20th century changed the way people live, and the way they understand art and design.
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/ The College for Creative Studies

The College for Creative Studies nurtures the creativity that is vital to the enrichment of modern culture. The College educates visual artists and designers, knowledgeable in varied fields, who will be leaders in creative professions that shape society and advance economic growth. The College fosters students' resolve to pursue excellence, act ethically, embrace their responsibilities as citizens of diverse local and global communities, and learn throughout their lives. The College engages in community service by offering opportunities for artistic development and opening career pathways to talented individuals of all ages.
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/ Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is the world's largest institution dedicated to the African American experience.  The museum provides learning opportunities, exhibitions, programs and events based on collections and research that explore the diverse history and culture of African Americans and their African origins. Housing over 30,000 artifacts and archival materials and home to the Blanche Coggin Underground Railroad Collection, Harriet Tubman Museum Collection, Coleman A. Young Collection and the Sheffield Collection, a repository of documents of the labor movement in Detroit, and more. 
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/ SALT & CEDAR LETTERPRESS

SALT & CEDAR is a letterpress studio in the heart of Eastern Market in Detroit. Letterpress printing is the focal point
for SALT & CEDAR's investigations into means of production and dissemination--tapping into creative economies and generating fresh approaches and alliances. SALT & CEDAR is excited to host visiting artists, curate exhibitions, offer workshops and convivial gatherings, and be available to the city as a resource for the arts. 
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